“Precious Cargo,” Greg’s November, 2014 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, flying destinations, Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , on September 25, 2014 by Greg Brown

Lavender by Air

7-GregBrownFT1114_1144eSmw1200What makes something precious? The price tag? Or perhaps that someone you love desires it?

We recently suffered a traumatic horticultural loss — one of Jean’s treasured Provence Lavender plants. She bought them several years ago at the annual Red Rock Farms Lavender Festival outside tiny Concho, Arizona. (See “Scent of the Sky,” FT 6/10.)

Under Jean’s careful tending, the aromatic plants have since flourished in our front yard from 4-inch seedlings to glorious, 3-foot purple-blossomed bushes. Appealing as lavender may be to humans, it’s refreshingly unappetizing to elk, rabbits, and javelina. So we never anticipated losing one to a gopher dining from underneath. I asked Jean if she planned to replace it.

RedRockLavenderRanchAloft-ConchoAZ_1128eSmw1200“I’d like to,” she said, “but it’s challenging finding hardy lavender locally. The last bushes I planted didn’t last.”

“So the Concho plants are hardier?”

“Yeah, they seem better suited to our climate. But although Red Rock offers other lavender products online, they only sell plants during their annual festival that ended last month.” I offered to inquire about flying over to get some.

“No,” she said. “It seems impractical flying almost to New Mexico to buy a few plants.” That ended the discussion for a few days — until I next encountered Jean pondering the remains of her beloved lavender bush.

“I wonder if I can bring it back to life,” she said, but that didn’t look promising.

Admitting it might not make sense flying halfway across the state to buy three or four plants, I asked if other gardeners in her club might want some. That apparently passed the test, so I phoned Red Rock Farms owner Mike Teeple…

READ THIS MONTH’S ENTIRE FLYING CARPET COLUMN,PRECIOUS CARGO.” (Please allow a moment for the article to load.)

Top photo: Mike Teeple of Red Rock Farms loads lavender plants at St. Johns Industrial Air Park, Arizona.

Bottom photo: Aerial view of Red Rock Lavender Farm, near Concho, Arizona. SEE MORE PHOTOS!

(This column first appeared in AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

©2014 Gregory N.Brown

One-time opportunity – Save on Greg’s “Flying Carpet” Fine Art Prints!

Posted in Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 16, 2014 by Greg Brown

SunsetRainshowers_1156-Hance8bitNoTankSmw1200

Save on a Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Print!

Over the past 18 months I’ve enjoyed as many as three Views from the Flying Carpet photography exhibits running concurrently. That’s been a thrill, and the work has been enthusiastically received.

Normally, my prints are individually made to order, including exhibit sales. So now, as the exhibit prints come down, I find myself lacking display or inventory space.

SharlotHallMuseumFCexhibit_0029-EditeSmw1200Therefore, I’ve decided to discount the previously-exhibited prints, and cover sales tax or domestic shipping. That amounts to savings of $100-400 per print, depending on size.

All prints are museum-mounted with non-glare lustre finish*, and have been displayed in secure museum or gallery settings.

See DISCOUNT LIST HERE. This is a one-time offer — when sold, they’re gone. (My regular pricing is not changing.)

  • Sale print prices include Arizona sales tax OR regular shipping within the continental US. (Prints may also be picked up in Flagstaff or Phoenix.)
  • Sales are first-come, first-served.
  • This offer applies only to the specific individual prints listed in blue.

Please CONTACT ME DIRECTLY TO ORDER discounted prints.

This is a one-time opportunity, so if your dream print is on the discount list, act on it!

Greg

Top photo: Sunset Rains. Lower photo: Sunset Over Window Rock.

*Frameless, reflection-free “museum mount-lustre” prints are bonded to Dibond aluminum-and-polyolefin sheet with museum-back subframe, with a non-glare UV-protective film laminate over the print surface. (See example.) Greg’s favorite!

Last chance to see Greg’s Phoenix “Views from the Flying Carpet” photography exhibit!

Posted in Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 5, 2014 by Greg Brown

Greg-SharlotHallFCopening_JanCollinsphoto_5024eCrSmw1200Only one week remains to see my Phoenix Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Aerial Photography Exhibit!

IMG_3355-1024x682See two dozen of my finest photographs, at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Papago Park, through September 14th, 2014.

No further exhibits are currently planned.

Visit the museum at 1300 N. College Ave. Tempe, Arizona. (The exhibit gallery is directly upstairs from the reception desk.)

Gallery Hours
Tues. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Sun. noon – 4 p.m.
Closed on Mondays and state holidays

Museum admission is $5 for adults, with discounts for young people and seniors. Children under 11 are free.

CHECK OUT MY ONE-TIME AFTER-SHOW TAKEDOWN SALE!

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“We are not alone,” Greg’s October, 2014 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2014 by Greg Brown

The bond between pilots, airplanes, and mechanics

RussMonroe_GuardianMedicalHelicopter_KingmanAirport-IGM_1013eSmw1200“Only fourteen starts left before she gets a hot section,” explained mechanic Russ Monroe, patting the scarlet engine housing of a Bell 407 helicopter. He spoke with gravity, as might a heart surgeon contemplating surgery.

Russ used to work on the Flying Carpet. I remember him excitedly regaling me at the maintenance hangar about a new and better method he’d found to set magneto timing for the engine. Another time, he delighted in discovering that the airplane had 500 hours on her vacuum pump, “and since this has been a light annual inspection, it might be a good time to preventatively replace it.”

Russ enjoyed other careers before earning his “A&P” (aircraft and powerplant) mechanic’s certificate, first in the US Navy and later as a radio broadcaster. He’s a wealth of knowledge on many topics, so we’ve always enjoyed talking airplanes or anything else. Then Russ left Flagstaff for a position as a roving helicopter mechanic. When I learned he was temporarily stationed in Kingman, I volunteered to visit him.

4-GregBrownFT1014_1027eSmw1200It’s “monsoon season” in Arizona, meaning a daily threat of afternoon thunderstorms. So I picked a day when Jean had an early commercial flight, and after dropping her at the airline terminal, took flight for Kingman.

Departing at 6:30am, I figured I had until at least midday before thunderstorms threatened. That optimism faded when I noted rain showers over Las Vegas; then pilot reports directed my attention to an isolated but massive storm cell near Parker, southwest of Kingman. Neither was an immediate threat, but at this early hour they were harbingers of more to come…

READ THE WHOLE STORY in this month’s Flying Carpet column, We Are Not Alone.” (Please allow a moment for the article to load.)

Top photo: Mechanic Russ Monroe preflights the rotor assembly on a Guardian Air Bell 407 helicopter, operated by Air Methods.

Bottom photo: Mothballed airliners clog the ramp at Kingman Airport, Arizona. SEE MORE PHOTOS!

(This column first appeared in the October, 2014 issue of AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

©2014 Gregory N.Brown

Visit Greg’s first Phoenix-area “Views from the Flying Carpet” photography exhibit!

Posted in Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 30, 2014 by Greg Brown

Greg-SharlotHallFCopening_JanCollinsphoto_5024eCrSmw1200Announcing my first Phoenix-area Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Aerial Photography Exhibit!

IMG_3355-1024x682See two dozen of my finest photographs, at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Papago Park, through September 14th, 2014.

Visit the museum at 1300 N. College Ave. Tempe, Arizona. (The exhibit is located in the upstairs gallery, directly above the reception desk.)

Gallery Hours
Tues. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Sun. noon – 4 p.m.
Closed on Mondays and state holidays

Museum admission is $5 for adults, with discounts for young people and seniors. Children under 11 are free.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“Summer Sightseeing,” Greg’s August, 2014 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2014 by Greg Brown

GrandFallsLittleColoradoRiverAloft_0231eSmw1200Not all who wander are lost

Once or twice a year I hear of friends visiting “Grand Falls,” a seasonal waterfall on Arizona’s Little Colorado River. Although the little-known 185-foot desert cataract is taller than Niagara Falls, it runs in volume only occasionally following mountain snow-melt, monsoon thunderstorms, or rare widespread rain.

Jean and I have always wanted to visit the landmark, but have been hampered both by its ephemeral water flow, and by the tortuous drive over primitive roads to reach its remote location northeast of Flagstaff. The rugged journey favors high-clearance vehicles, and traveling in pairs in case of breakdown. Invariably we either hear too late that the falls have been running, or are otherwise committed when invited to go.

Given the magnitude of the waterfall when flowing, I’d always assumed it would also be exciting to view from the air. But it’s not marked on sectional charts, nor many other maps for that matter, so finding it seemed a task in itself.

3-GregBrownFT814_0192eSmw1200Then one late-summer morning I found myself desperate to fly. Not having been aloft in weeks, and armed with a new camera that demanded “testing,” I decided on a lark to seek out Grand Falls and mark it for future reference in my GPS navigator. There’d been little rain lately, so I didn’t expect the falls to be running. But knowing their location would be useful for a future aerial visit when the right opportunity arose.

I first gleaned general coordinates and nearby landmarks via Internet search. I also knew the Little Colorado River runs northwestward from Winslow to ultimately join the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. By intercepting the Little Colorado near Winslow and tracing it downstream, I should easily find Grand Falls.

2-GregBrownFT814_0185eSmw1200The instant I departed the ground, I knew I’d picked the right day to fly. The sky sparkled cobalt, punctuated by snowy puffs of fair-weather cumulus. No sooner had I turned downwind for departure than I was mesmerized by a huge field of vivid yellow wildflowers bordering Lake Mary southeast of town. I diverted in that direction and sailed over the sea of golden blossoms. Floating in their midst like a spidery space station was the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer, an observatory that collects starlight from distant galaxies via widely dispersed light tubes, and calculates their distance from Earth via parallax.

Following a joyous few minutes savoring chrome-yellow flowers, I departed Flagstaff’s pine forest over high desert to intercept the Little Colorado River. I found it chiseled as if by a coping saw through crimson rock north of Winslow. Tracing the channel toward its distant Colorado River junction, I almost missed Grand Falls, as it proved virtually invisible from the upstream side. But for whatever reason, I happened to glance back. To my surprise and delight given the dry summer weather, the falls flowed vigorously.

READ THE WHOLE STORY in this month’s Flying Carpet column, “Summer Sightseeing.” (Please allow a moment for the article to load.)

Top photo: At 185 feet, Arizona’s “Grand Falls,” is taller than Niagara (note cars in foreground), but flows in volume only a few times a year. Upper right: Late-summer wildflowers tint the Coconino Plateau near Flagstaff, Arizona. Lower left: Wildflowers envelop the Navy Precision Optical Observatory. SEE MORE PHOTOS!

(This column first appeared in the July, 2014 issue of AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

©2014 Gregory N.Brown

“Secret Mountain Sunset,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

Posted in Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 26, 2014 by Greg Brown

Secret Mountain Sunset_1197PSe-H_ASmw1200

Although I’ve often photographed the area of “Secret Mountain Sunset” in daylight, never before have I experienced such an opportunity to capture the hulking rock towers of Arizona’s Red Rock / Secret Mountain Wilderness as they slip into night.

Secret Mountain Sunset debuts in Limited Edition 27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my first Phoenix-area Views from the Flying Carpet Arts Fine Art Aerial Photography exhibit at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Papago Park, Tempe, AZ, mid-July through September, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 140 other followers

%d bloggers like this: