“Lake Mead Shoreline,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

Posted in Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 11, 2014 by Greg Brown

Lake Mead Shoreline_0316-PSe-HSmw1200

Cobalt waters contrast against golden rock along the Lake Mead Shoreline, east of Las Vegas, Nevada.

I made this photograph one beautiful morning flying from Flagstaff to Las Vegas. The trip home, however, was far more harrowing. Read the story in my Flying Carpet column, “Good Roads to Land On.”

Lake Mead Shoreline debuts in Limited Edition 27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my Coconino Center for the Arts exhibit in Flagstaff, Arizona, from April 15-May 31, 2014, and my Sharlot Hall Museum exhibit in Prescott, Arizona through April 27th, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

Greg’s latest Fine Art Aerial Photography exhibit!

Posted in Greg's photographs on April 10, 2014 by Greg Brown

HuesPrintExhibitInstallCCA-CoconinoCenterForTheArts_1790eSmw1200

Hues from the Flying Carpet, my latest Fine Art Aerial Photography exhibition, opens Saturday evening, April 12th, and runs through May 31st at Flagstaff’s Coconino Center for the Arts.

Attend Saturday’s Opening Reception*! (You’ll also enjoy the associated “Local Color” exhibit.)

CoconinoCenterForTheArts_1754eSmw1200In other exhibit news, my Sharlot Hall Museum exhibit continues through April 27th in Prescott, and you can see two of my pieces at the Phoenix Art Museum InFocus Member Exhibit at the Vault Gallery, ASU Downtown Campus.

Finally, I’m pleased to announce my first Phoenix exhibit. Following the Sharlot Hall Museum show, my Views from the Flying Carpet exhibition will exhibit roughly June-September at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Tempe’s Papago Park.

Thanks to all for your ongoing encouragement and support!

Greg

Above left: Damon Taylor and Robyn Shipton put final touches on my new exhibition. Above right: Coconino Center for the Arts. See more installation photos.

*No RSVP is required to attend Saturday’s Opening. And you fly-in visitors are in luck; it’s a nearly-full-moon night!

“Pep Rally,” Greg’s May, 2014 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, Greg recommends, Greg's student pilot pep talks with tags , , , , , , on March 28, 2014 by Greg Brown

StudentPilotPepTalkFacebookGroup-MeyerEclipseJet_0854eSmw1200Share your gift of flight

When pilots-in-training get disheartened, a few well-placed words of encouragement can often keep them flying. So several years ago I organized a “Student Pilot Pep Talk” Facebook group.

Friendships blossomed, and some Southwest-area members recently proposed our first-ever fly-in rendezvous at Lake Havasu City Airport, Arizona (KHII). I asked along student pilot Victoria Coleman, who’d recently celebrated her first solo. When Victoria boasted of her husband Paul helping her study, I invited him too.

Victoria and I agreed that rather than make this a “lesson,” we’d share piloting duties as equals: she’d handle the radios and navigate while I flew. Once aloft, Paul enthused about his wife’s newfound skills.

“We recently bought property in Pagosa Springs,” he said. “Victoria will be able to pilot us there!” Although Victoria was yet to start cross-country training, she’d thoroughly scouted our route and destination airport, and compiled relevant radio frequencies. And though new to aerial navigation, she precisely tracked our location via outside landmarks. It turned out she’s always loved maps, and as a child aspired to be a cartographer.

“You’re a natural at this!” I said.

“I felt that way, until the other day,” Victoria replied. “I recently had a great solo day in the pattern. But last time I flew, there was a light crosswind. I wasn’t sure I could handle it, so I landed. Now I’m nervous about mastering landings, and about flying by myself…”

READ THE WHOLE STORY in this month’s Flying Carpet column, “PEP RALLY.” (Please allow a moment for the article to load.)

Photo: Members of Greg’s “Student Pilot Pep Talk” Facebook Group rendezvous at Lake Havasu City Airport, Arizona. L-R: Mike Hardison, Ken Meyer, Bijan Maleki and Miranda Rydstrom, Brian and Theresa Farley, Paul and Victoria Coleman, Paul Meehl, and Shari Meyer. SEE MORE PHOTOS HERE.

(This column first appeared in the May, 2014 AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

©2014 Gregory N.Brown

speaking of flying carpets…

Posted in life & love on March 16, 2014 by Greg Brown

Speaking of flying carpets, is this not the coolest rendition ever?

Vasnetsov_samolet

“The Flying Carpet” – Viktor Vasnetsov, 1880

via Reddit->Wikipedia.

“Crimson Clouds,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

Posted in Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 14, 2014 by Greg Brown
Crimson Clouds_1165-PSeH_CorrectedSmw1200

I captured these “Crimson Clouds” and rain showers tinting the western sky over Arizona’s Verde Valley. (Read the story behind this photograph in my Flying Carpet column, “Enchanted Journey.”)

Crimson Clouds debuts in Limited Edition  27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my Sharlot Hall Museum exhibit in Prescott, Arizona through April 27th, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“Fickle Snow,” Greg’s April, 2014 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, flying destinations, Greg recommends with tags , , , , , on February 27, 2014 by Greg Brown

SedonaSnowshowersAloft_0743PS_v2-Edit-2eSmw1200Little room for error

Dark clouds fringed the western sky when I departed Prescott. With appointments to make, I’d monitored the weather all day. Our home airport of Flagstaff expected gradually lowering ceilings after 6pm, and snow beginning after 8. I picked up Jean in Scottsdale at 4:30, later than I’d hoped, but a tailwind promised to hurry us home in under an hour.

Our destination still reported clear skies when we took off, as did all stations along our route, but those ominous clouds approached relentlessly from the west. Williams, 40 miles west of Flagstaff, reported visual conditions in light snow. In any case, we carried plenty of fuel to land at Sedona, Cottonwood, or Winslow, or return to Scottsdale.

Halfway home over the Verde Valley, I noted shades of green threatening Flagstaff on the datalink weather display. Little precipitation was likely reaching the ground, but this was unexpectedly early. Then the tint changed to pink. Snow! I told Jean we might be driving a rental car home from Sedona tonight.

“But we’ll arrive well before 6,” said Jean, taking the forecast literally. “Surely, we’ll beat the weather.” Maybe she was right. Flagstaff’s Pulliam Airport still reported good visual flying conditions: clouds at 2,400 broken, 6,000 overcast, and 9 miles visibility in light snow.

Nearing Sedona, we heard Albuquerque Center clear an aircraft for Flagstaff’s instrument landing system (ILS). That’s a popular training approach, so I asked the controller whether he’d issued it for practice or for ‘real weather.’

“Flagstaff is still reporting VFR,” he replied, “but the last two pilots landing there thought a visual approach would be sketchy, so both shot the ILS.” These were turbine aircraft descending from the flight levels, however, so they’d need to penetrate the overcast while we approached from underneath. Sedona soon sparkled delightfully beneath us, crowned with a solitary snow flurry illuminated by the setting sun. Ahead the distant horizon bisected an inviting if faraway sliver of sky beyond the overcast.

It’s always a bit discomforting flying under a cloud ceiling onto the plateau. Here you are cruising comfortably under a high overcast, and the ground suddenly rises up to squeeze you. Confirming as we approached that the ceiling indeed floated a healthy 2,500 feet above the plateau, I took momentary leave from Center and radioed Flagstaff tower that I was 7 minutes south and requesting the trend.

“The weather’s definitely deteriorating,” replied the tower controller, “but we’re still decent VFR, especially to the south where you’re coming from. If it’s a matter of just 7 minutes you should be in good shape.” Retrieving instrument charts for backup, I advised Albuquerque that we’d proceed visually to Flagstaff with Sedona as our alternate. Topping the plateau, we intercepted Interstate 17, which would lead us directly to the airport and ensure terrain clearance. Flight conditions remained excellent, so I said goodbye to Center. “Be safe!” said the controller as we cruised blithely homeward.

“Shouldn’t we see the runway by now?” asked Jean a few moments later…

READ THE WHOLE STORY in this month’s Flying Carpet column, “FICKLE SNOW.” (Please allow a moment for the article to load.)

Photo: Sunset illuminates an isolated snow shower over Sedona, Arizona, on our flight home. 

(This column first appeared in the April, 2014 AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

©2014 Gregory N.Brown

“Six Mile Canyon,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

Posted in Greg's photographs with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 14, 2014 by Greg Brown
Six Mile Canyon 0831-HSmw1200

I captured this detail of Six Mile Canyon, en route to Albuquerque over New Mexico’s Cibola National Forest. As I often do when photographing  dramatically tinted terrain, I incorporated bordering vegetation into the photo so viewers would appreciate that the canyon’s vibrant colors are genuine.

This photograph was taken on a flight associated with my September, 2011 Flying Carpet column, “Game Plan.”

Six Mile Canyon debuts in Limited Edition  27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my Sharlot Hall Museum exhibit in Prescott, Arizona — extended through April 27th, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 122 other followers

%d bloggers like this: