“Eclipse!” Greg’s featured past column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, flying destinations with tags on April 25, 2017 by Greg Brown

North America’s first total solar eclipse in decades will span the entire continent this coming August 21st, 2017.

For those wondering what a total solar eclipse might be like and whether it’s worth experiencing—believe me, it is—I thought you might enjoy revisiting the last one, which I flew to Canada to see back in 1979.

READ THE STORY in my March, 2002, Flying Carpet column, “ECLIPSE!”

(An expanded version appears in my book, Flying Carpet: The Soul of an Airplane.)

If you’re interested in traveling to see the eclipse along the path of totality, don’t delay in making reservations, and that includes reserving a day fly-in spot at even relatively remote airports. Yes, it’s four months away but lodging and airports are already filling up!

Photo: Total solar eclipse, Gimli Manitoba, 1979. SEE MORE PHOTOS HERE.

2017 Total Solar Eclipse details HERE. (⇐This web site has detailed eclipse maps for each state, along with lots of other cool reference info.)

Greg

“Land on a Cloud” Greg’s May, 2017 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, flying destinations, Greg's piloting tips with tags , , , , , , on March 31, 2017 by Greg Brown

There’s nothing like flying to escape the beaten path. Returning from Massachusetts to Arizona, Jean and I steered for Warren and Melissa Smith’s private Atlanta, Illinois farm strip. Landing on grass is like alighting on a cloud, but you must always scout it first. Warren, an FAA Aviation Safety Inspector, shared details.

“It rained the other night, so I drove the strip in my car,” he said. “It’s in great shape, plus I confirmed the 2300-foot usable length with a wheel. Ideally, land from the south because there’s a 300-foot overrun at the north end–touch down upon clearing the corn. From the north, land past the metal “Hoblit Farms” building. In case of concerns, of course, divert to nearby Logan County Airport.”

We’d hoped to make Illinois nonstop, but headwinds dictated refueling at Logansport, Indiana. Despite bargain prices, I resisted topping tanks; it’s best to operate light on turf.

During our final one-hour leg, I reviewed soft-field procedures and runway requirements. Although 2300 feet is plenty for a Skylane, grass demands proper technique and lengthens takeoff roll…

**READ THE ENTIRE COLUMN, LAND ON A CLOUD**

Top photo: “The Flying Carpet at Hoblit Farms’s private grass strip, Atlanta, Illinois.” [Larry Collins photo.]

Lower photo: “Larry Collins, Warren and Melissa Smith, and ‘Ace,’ greet us at the Hoblit Farms strip.”

SEE MORE PHOTOS HERE!

And check out the following video of the Flying Carpet in Illinois Farmland, by Larry Collins.

(This column first appeared in AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

Greg

©2017 Gregory N. Brown

“Big Kids Aloft” Greg’s April, 2017 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, flying destinations with tags , , , , , , , on March 2, 2017 by Greg Brown

alexrosenbaum-allenrosenblatt_pittsfieldairport-kpsf_pitsfieldma_5239esmw1200We relaxed with our son Hannis and his fiancée Marissa on Richmond Pond in western Massachusetts, our fourth flying destination crossing the continent from Arizona.

Marissa’s folks Alex and Sabina had been consummate hosts, treating us to sightseeing, concerts, and savory meals. Alex even let me drive his vintage Miata sports car. In return, all he asked was to go flying. Alex had once taken lessons, but circumstances prevented him from finishing. Now he was eager to retake the controls. Once a pilot, always a pilot.

On the appointed morning, however, broken clouds shrouded the lush green mountaintops surrounding Pittsfield Municipal Airport, with no improvement expected. To our mutual disappointment, it wasn’t safe to fly.

Midday came, and as I toted luggage to Hannis and Marissa’s car for their drive home, sunlight momentarily silvered Richmond Pond. Quietly, I checked weather. Area ceilings were indeed thinning, and had risen off all but the highest peaks. What’s more, an amended forecast indicated continuing improvement. I asked Alex what was planned for the afternoon.

“Nothing until dinner,” he replied.

“Then let’s go flying!” …

**READ THIS MONTH’S ENTIRE COLUMN, BIG KIDS ALOFT**

Photo: “Alex (L) and Allen celebrate our flight at Pittsfield Municipal Airport, Massachusetts. (KPSF)” See more photos here!

(This column first appeared in AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

Greg

©2017 Gregory N. Brown

“Parlez-vous Anglais?” Greg’s March, 2017 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, flying destinations with tags , , , , , , , , on January 26, 2017 by Greg Brown

gregbrownft317_5569esmw1200“Be aware of a Citation jet practicing instrument approaches, and numerous aircraft flying the Trois-Rivières traffic pattern,” cautioned Montreal Center after issuing our instrument clearance from Quebec back to the States.

Not until reaching the runway did Jean and I fully appreciate the implications. How could we determine when to take the runway with so much traffic chattering in a foreign tongue? We might as well be on another planet!

Every aspect of this flight to French Canada had been impacted by language…

**READ THIS MONTH’S ENTIRE COLUMN, PARLEZ-VOUS ANGLAIS?**

Photo: “Space-age terminal building at Trois-Rivières Airport, Quebec.” See more photos here!

(This column first appeared in AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

Greg

PS: The dichroic-glass bola tie in my new new author photo this month comes from my friends Dana and Karen at Robbins Ranch Art Glass. Check out their wonderful work!

©2017 Gregory N. Brown

Choosing a good flight instructor

Posted in Greg's piloting tips, learn to fly! on January 13, 2017 by Greg Brown

Greg Brown's Flying Carpet Blog

fc-cover-photo-smThe single most important factor in good flight training is lining up an excellent flight instructor (“CFI”). Since flying is largely taught one-on-one, the right instructor will greatly enhance your quality of learning, your safety and competence, and your ultimate enjoyment of flying.

Good training can be found at flight schools of any size — quality should be your key factor in making the decision. Start by asking acquaintances who fly locally if they can recommend a good instructor or flight program. Good referrals always mean a lot. The next step is to visit several different flight schools at nearby general aviation airports, and interview flight instructors at each one. (While you’re at the airport, approach some pilots you see operating light aircraft, and ask if they have any instructor or flight school recommendations.)

To evaluate each instructor you interview, ask him or her to:

  1. Detail the process for completing your…

View original post 230 more words

Greg’s latest “Pilot Achievement Plaque”

Posted in Greg's photographs, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on January 10, 2017 by Greg Brown

scotttabakosr-pilotplaque_215142esm1200

I thought you might enjoy seeing my latest Pilot Achievement Plaque, ordered for Scott Tabako Sr. by his son Scott Jr. to celebrate Scott Sr. earning his private pilot certificate, and featuring “Winter Stratus,” one of my renowned Views from the Flying Carpet.

Whether it’s to celebrate first solo, a newly-earned pilot certificate or rating, or a new-to-you airplane, these large 10″ x 20″ frameless, ready-to-hang metal plaques feature your supplied photo and pilot achievement, highlighted with your favorite pilot vista from Greg’s renowned Views from the Flying Carpet aerial photographs. (Only $124 plus s&h and applicable sales tax!)

Congrats, Scott Tabako, Sr, on earning your wings! And thank you, Scott Jr!

Greg

“Full Circle,” Greg’s February, 2017 Flying Carpet column

Posted in flying adventures, Flying Carpet column, flying destinations, Greg's piloting tips with tags , , , , , , , , on December 30, 2016 by Greg Brown

Bienvenue au Québec!

lisejeanmarcel-duvalpatio_stlawrencerivership_champlainquebec_4677-editesmw1200You’d expect a flying carpet to deliver you to enchanted destinations. Well, 2,000 miles and fifteen flight hours from home over French Canada, Jean and I truly felt our steed’s magic. After clearing customs at Windsor, Ontario, we gazed down upon Toronto, Ottawa, and then, Montreal. Each resurrected memories of a long-ago youthful journey.

In 1971, I drove this route on a post-graduation road trip with two Chicago high-school buddies in my 1939 Chevy. After setting up camp in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, we picked up a hitchhiker named Marcel while cruising town. Lacking a common language, we couldn’t determine his destination, so he gestured us to a nearby tavern.

“If you’ll break camp and drive me 15 miles to Champlain,” Marcel offered via the bilingual bartender, “you can stay in the guest cottage behind my parents’ house.” We accepted, and while the others slept, Marcel and I “talked” late into the night via sketch pad and French-English dictionary. The next morning, I was startled awake by the horn blast of an oceangoing freighter. Having arrived in darkness, I never guessed the St. Lawrence Seaway was steps away.

I was recounting this story to Jean for the umpteenth time when Toronto Center issued a frequency change. Bienvenue au Québec! Air traffic control is bilingual in Quebec, so Montreal Center controllers swap seamlessly between French with Québécois pilots, and English with Anglophones like me. The mighty St. Lawrence River materialized off our right wing, and thirty minutes later converged with our course at our destination. Inbound to land at the uncontrolled airport, we heard the following transmission.

“Trafic Trois-Rivières, Cessna Un-Sept-Deux Golf Alpha Bravo Charlie, présentement sur Alpha, je m’aligne Piste Deux Trois pour un décollage immédiat.” Jean and I looked to each another, eyebrows raised. The pilot was obviously in the local traffic pattern, but where? I requested his position in English, but he answered in French. Eventually he managed the word, “takeoff,” but we never spotted the airplane. Clearly, great care would be required to safely operate here.

I was securing the Flying Carpet when two figures rushed from the terminal, arms outstretched. It was Marcel Duval, the very hitchhiker I picked up in 1971, and his captivating wife, Lise Marquis. Who’d have imagined that our chance friendship would endure for decades…

**READ THIS MONTH’S ENTIRE COLUMN, FULL CIRCLE**

Photo: “Toasting friendship with Marcel Duval and Lise Marquis at their home overlooking the St. Lawrence River in Champlain, Quebec.” See more photos here!

(This column first appeared in AOPA Flight Training magazine.)

Greg

©2016 Gregory N.Brown

%d bloggers like this: