One-time opportunity – Save on Greg’s “Flying Carpet” Fine Art Prints!

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Save on a Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Print!

Over the past 18 months I’ve enjoyed as many as three Views from the Flying Carpet photography exhibits running concurrently. That’s been a thrill, and the work has been enthusiastically received.

Normally, my prints are individually made to order, including exhibit sales. So now, as the exhibit prints come down, I find myself lacking display or inventory space.

SharlotHallMuseumFCexhibit_0029-EditeSmw1200Therefore, I’ve decided to discount the previously-exhibited prints, and cover sales tax or domestic shipping. That amounts to savings of $100-400 per print, depending on size.

All prints are museum-mounted with non-glare lustre finish*, and have been displayed in secure museum or gallery settings.

See DISCOUNT LIST HERE. This is a one-time offer — when sold, they’re gone. (My regular pricing is not changing.)

  • Sale print prices include Arizona sales tax OR regular shipping within the continental US. (Prints may also be picked up in Flagstaff or Phoenix.)
  • Sales are first-come, first-served.
  • This offer applies only to the specific individual prints listed in blue.

Please CONTACT ME DIRECTLY TO ORDER discounted prints.

This is a one-time opportunity, so if your dream print is on the discount list, act on it!

Greg

Top photo: Sunset Rains. Lower photo: Sunset Over Window Rock.

*Frameless, reflection-free “museum mount-lustre” prints are bonded to Dibond aluminum-and-polyolefin sheet with museum-back subframe, with a non-glare UV-protective film laminate over the print surface. (See example.) Greg’s favorite!

Last chance to see Greg’s Phoenix “Views from the Flying Carpet” photography exhibit!

Greg-SharlotHallFCopening_JanCollinsphoto_5024eCrSmw1200Only one week remains to see my Phoenix Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Aerial Photography Exhibit!

IMG_3355-1024x682See two dozen of my finest photographs, at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Papago Park, through September 14th, 2014.

No further exhibits are currently planned.

Visit the museum at 1300 N. College Ave. Tempe, Arizona. (The exhibit gallery is directly upstairs from the reception desk.)

Gallery Hours
Tues. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Sun. noon – 4 p.m.
Closed on Mondays and state holidays

Museum admission is $5 for adults, with discounts for young people and seniors. Children under 11 are free.

CHECK OUT MY ONE-TIME AFTER-SHOW TAKEDOWN SALE!

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

Visit Greg’s first Phoenix-area “Views from the Flying Carpet” photography exhibit!

Greg-SharlotHallFCopening_JanCollinsphoto_5024eCrSmw1200Announcing my first Phoenix-area Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Aerial Photography Exhibit!

IMG_3355-1024x682See two dozen of my finest photographs, at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Papago Park, through September 14th, 2014.

Visit the museum at 1300 N. College Ave. Tempe, Arizona. (The exhibit is located in the upstairs gallery, directly above the reception desk.)

Gallery Hours
Tues. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Sun. noon – 4 p.m.
Closed on Mondays and state holidays

Museum admission is $5 for adults, with discounts for young people and seniors. Children under 11 are free.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“Secret Mountain Sunset,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

Although I’ve often photographed the area of “Secret Mountain Sunset” in daylight, never before have I experienced such an opportunity to capture the hulking rock towers of Arizona’s Red Rock / Secret Mountain Wilderness as they slip into night.

Secret Mountain Sunset debuts in Limited Edition 27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my first Phoenix-area Views from the Flying Carpet Arts Fine Art Aerial Photography exhibit at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Papago Park, Tempe, AZ, mid-July through September, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“Death Valley Salt Flats II,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

I photographed “Death Valley Salt Flats II,” near Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America, at 282 ft (86 m) below sea level.

Death Valley is the most other-worldly place Jean and I have ever encountered, both on the ground and from aloft. Swirling “salt devils” arise from bone-white salt flats to pierce a cobalt sky, contrasting against shockingly vibrant mineral deposits tinting the surrounding cliffs and mountains with unnatural color.

Read my Flying Carpet column, “Birthday Flowers,” describing this particular trip. (This column first appeared in AOPA Flight Training magazine, June, 2005.)

Death Valley Salt Flats II debuts in Limited Edition 27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my Coconino Center for the Arts Fine Art Aerial Photography exhibit in Flagstaff, Arizona, through May 31, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“Lake Mead Shoreline,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

Cobalt waters contrast against golden rock along the Lake Mead Shoreline, east of Las Vegas, Nevada.

I made this photograph one beautiful morning flying from Flagstaff to Las Vegas. The trip home, however, was far more harrowing. Read the story in my Flying Carpet column, “Good Roads to Land On.”

Lake Mead Shoreline debuts in Limited Edition 27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my Coconino Center for the Arts exhibit in Flagstaff, Arizona, from April 15-May 31, 2014, and my Sharlot Hall Museum exhibit in Prescott, Arizona through April 27th, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“Crimson Clouds,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

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I captured these “Crimson Clouds” and rain showers tinting the western sky over Arizona’s Verde Valley. (Read the story behind this photograph in my Flying Carpet column, “Enchanted Journey.”)

Crimson Clouds debuts in Limited Edition  27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my Sharlot Hall Museum exhibit in Prescott, Arizona through April 27th, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

“Six Mile Canyon,” Greg’s Aerial Fine Art Photographic Print

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I captured this detail of Six Mile Canyon, en route to Albuquerque over New Mexico’s Cibola National Forest. As I often do when photographing  dramatically tinted terrain, I incorporated bordering vegetation into the photo so viewers would appreciate that the canyon’s vibrant colors are genuine.

This photograph was taken on a flight associated with my September, 2011 Flying Carpet column, “Game Plan.”

Six Mile Canyon debuts in Limited Edition  27″x40″ and 24″x36″ prints, and Open Editions of 16″x24″ and 10″x14″. Print prices start at $175. See detailed pricing and ordering information.

Like all my Views from the Flying Carpet, this photograph was collaboratively tuned for print with Master Photographic Printer Richard Jackson, who prints for the world’s finest photographers. Each individual print is meticulously crafted, mounted as appropriate, and packaged for shipping under Mr. Jackson’s supervision.

Learn more about my Views from the Flying Carpet Fine Art Photographic Prints, including available images, and our process for creating these marvelous prints.

View a video about my aerial photography, and subscribe for email updates.

Hope you enjoy this view from my cockpit!

Greg

PS: Visit my Sharlot Hall Museum exhibit in Prescott, Arizona — extended through April 27th, 2014.

©2014 Gregory N. Brown

shoot better ILS and LPV precision approaches

fc-cover-photo-smPilots often have difficulty maintaining the localizer on ILS (or GPS-LPV) approaches:

“I’m always chasing the localizer needle and get so frustrated that I forget to maintain the glideslope needle; then I have to miss the approach.”

In my experience, this common problem most often occurs when pilots make excessive heading changes, rather than because the wind has changed. These pointers should help:

1. Join the final approach course far enough out to allow time to nail down your wind-corrected heading before joining the glideslope. Ask ATC to put you on the final approach course a mile or two outside the final approach fix. That will reduce your workload.

2. Commit to memory the heading you’ve identified to fly, and return to that heading whenever you drift off. Say you’ve determined that, with wind correction, you need 360 degrees inbound heading to stay on the localizer. Now MEMORIZE that 360 heading, AND RETURN TO IT EVERY TIME YOU DRIFT OFF HEADING. If you look away for a moment, your heading has likely changed. If your heading is not exactly 360 when you look back, turn immediately back to 360, level wings, and THEN check the localizer needle to see what it’s doing. This will stabilize your heading on the approach.

3. Limit final approach course heading corrections to  5º at a time. (You’re probably used to using 10° corrections or more to track VOR or enroute GPS.) If you do need to correct the heading, MEMORIZE the new one. So if you’re inbound on that 360° heading and notice the localizer needle drifting to the left, make a CONSCIOUS HEADING ADJUSTMENT of five degrees left (355º), turn to it, and memorize it. Again, if you drift off that heading turn immediately back to 355° before making any other corrections.

4. Make all localizer or LPV heading corrections using ½ standard rate turn. (That’ll reduce the “chasing.”)

5. Throughout the approach, continually reset the heading bug on your heading indicator to mark the heading you want to fly. If you have no heading bug, consider installing an add-on bug, or an indicator that has one. A heading bug helps tremendously in keeping you pointed where you want to go using minimal brainpower.

All this may sound elementary, but it’s not. Most pilots are busy enough on precision approaches that they chase the needle rather than consciously selecting, remembering, and holding a heading. But stabilizing your heading anywhere near the correct one prevents the needle from drifting much, so it’s easier to correct. That’s why it’s more effective to hold a heading (and return immediately to it if you drift off) than to chase the needle without a specific heading in mind.

Obviously, it’s hard to absorb this sort of thing from reading. But try these tips when you next practice precision approaches, and I think you’ll be pleased with the improvement. (See also my post, “IFR made easier…“)

©2009, 2014 Gregory N. Brown